UCSF Medical Center Named One of Top 10 Hospitals Nationwide and Best in Bay Area

By Karin Rush-Monroe, UCSF News Office | July 16, 2009

UCSF Medical Center ranks among the nation's top 10 premier hospitals and is the best in the Bay Area, according to the new 2009-10 America's Best Hospitals survey conducted by U.S. News & World Report.

This year UCSF retains its place as the seventh best hospital in the country, earning a spot on the survey's "honor roll." Of the 4,861 medical centers evaluated by U.S. News, only 21 earned honor roll status, demonstrating excellence and breadth of expertise by ranking at or near the top in at least six specialties.

The U.S. News score summarizes overall quality of inpatient care including reputation, mortality, patient safety, and quality-related measures, such as patient volume and nursing care. This is the ninth consecutive year UCSF has earned a top 10 ranking and honor roll status.

"I want to commend the UCSF clinicians, faculty, and staff of the medical center for keeping the health of our patients at the forefront of everything they do," said UCSF Medical Center CEO Mark Laret. "We consistently rank among the nation's top hospitals because of their unwavering commitment to continually improving the quality and delivery of our care."

In addition to the overall ranking, U.S. News also evaluated 16 medical specialties. UCSF distinguished itself in the following areas:



  • In 11 of those specialties, UCSF placed among the top 10 medical centers nationwide: cancer; diabetes and endocrine disorders; digestive disorders; geriatric care; gynecology; kidney disorders; neurology and neurosurgery; ophthalmology; respiratory disorders; rheumatology; and urology.

  • In five specialties, UCSF is the top-ranked facility in both California and the Bay Area: cancer; diabetes and endocrine disorders; gynecology; neurology and neurosurgery; and respiratory disorders. UCSF also is ranked best in the Bay Area in six additional specialties: digestive disorders; geriatric care; kidney disorders; ophthalmology; rheumatology; and urology.



Read more at Karin Rush-Monroe, UCSF News Office