Three UCSF Professors Inducted into American Academy of Arts and Sciences

By Public Affairs | October 18, 2011

UCSF
At a ceremony on Oct. 1, UCSF Professors Lewis Lanier, Talmadge King, Jr. and Kevan Shokat sign the American Academy of Arts and Sciences’ Book of Members, a tradition that dates back to 1780.

Three UCSF professors were among 179 of the nation’s most influential artists, scientists, scholars, authors and institutional leaders who were inducted on Oct. 1 into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, one of the nation’s most prestigious honorary societies and a leading center for independent policy research.

The three new UCSF inductees are:



  • Talmadge Everett King, Jr., Julius R. Krevans Distinguished Professor in Internal Medicine and Chair, Department of Medicine;
  • Lewis Lee Lanier, American Cancer Research Professor; professor and chair, Department of Microbiology and Immunology; and professor, Cancer Research Institute; and
  • Kevan M. Shokat, professor and chair, Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology.


“Induction recognizes extraordinary individual achievement and marks a commitment on the part of new members to provide fundamental, non-partisan knowledge for addressing today’s complex challenges,” said American Academy President Leslie C. Berlowitz.

The 231st Class of the Academy includes winners of Nobel, Pritzker, and Pulitzer prizes; the Turing Award; MacArthur and Guggenheim Fellowships; Kennedy Center Honors; and Grammy, Golden Globe, and Academy awards. Foreign Honorary Members from Argentina, India, Israel, Japan, and the United Kingdom were also inducted.

Participants in the Oct. 1 ceremony included: singer-songwriter Paul Simon, groundbreaking researcher and biologist Frances Arnold of the California Institute of Technology; author and literary critic Denis Donoghue, University Professor and the Henry James Professor of English and American Letters at New York University and Sir Adam Roberts, President of the British Academy and one of the foremost experts on international strategic affairs.

Members contribute to academy studies of science and technology policy, global security, social policy and American institutions, the humanities, and education.



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