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Well-Known Cell Protein Reveals New Tricks

Discovery of Clathrin Protein's Key Role in Cell Division Could Help Understanding of Cancer

By Jason Bardi    |   ucsf.edu | September 6, 2012

Well-Known Cell Protein Reveals New Tricks

Frances Brodsky, DPhil

A protein called “clathrin,” which is found in every human cell and plays a critical role in transporting materials within them, also plays a key role in cell division, according to new research at the University of California, San Francisco.

The discovery, featured on the cover of the Journal of Cell Biology in August, sheds light on the process of cell division and provides a new angle for understanding cancer. Without clathrin, cells divide erratically and unevenly — a phenomenon that is one of the hallmarks of the disease.

“Clathrin is doing more than we thought it was doing,” said Frances Brodsky, DPhil, who led the research. Brodsky is a professor in the UCSF Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, a joint department of the Schools of Pharmacy and Medicine, and she holds joint appointments in Microbiology and Immunology, as well as Pharmaceutical Chemistry.

A Protein Essential for Transportation in More Than One Route

Akin to a three-pronged building block in a child’s construction set, clathrin can provide links to create larger complexes. When lots of these proteins are assembled together, they can form tough little cages into which cells packs many of their essential biological molecules — hormones, neurotransmitters, membrane proteins and other payloads that need to be transported throughout the cell.

Read the published study

Once thought to be solely involved in transport inside cells, scientists have uncovered more and more of the protein’s hidden functions in the last half-dozen years, including some roles it plays in cell division.

Read more at ucsf.edu