Study Sheds Light on How Pancreatic Cancer Begins

By Debra Kain    |   ucsdnews.ucsd.edu | November 29, 2012

Study Sheds Light on How Pancreatic Cancer Begins

A diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is particularly devastating since the prognosis for recovery is usually poor, with the cancer most often not detected until late stages.

Research led by scientists at the University of California, San Diego and UC San Francisco Schools of Medicine examined the tumor-initiating events leading to pancreatic cancer (also called pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma or PDA) in mice. Their work, published on line November 29 in the journal Cancer Cell, may help in the search for earlier detection methods and treatments.

“Previously, it was believed that this cancer arises from the epithelial cells in pancreatic ducts,” said Maike Sander, MD, professor of pediatrics and cellular and molecular medicine and director of UC San Diego’s Pediatric Diabetes Research Center, co-principal investigator of the study along with Matthias Hebrok, PhD, director of the UCSF Diabetes Center. “But in this study, we show that ducts have almost no response to oncogenic mutations – mutations that give rise to cancerous tumors.”

The study revealed that another pancreatic cell type, called the acinar cell, converts into a duct-like cell that initiates tumors. The researchers also showed that inflammation of the pancreas, which is a significant risk factor for pancreatic cancer, promotes the conversion of acinar cells into duct-like tumor precursors.

Kras is a gene that may cause cancer when it is mutated. It makes the Kras protein, which is involved in cell signaling pathways, cell growth and apoptosis, or cell death. Agents that block the activity of the mutated Kras gene or its protein may stop the growth of cancer.

read more at ucsd.edu