UCSF Tops Medical Schools, Public Institutions In NIH Research Funds

By Kristin Bole    |   UCSF.edu | July 16, 2013

UCSF Tops Medical Schools, Public Institutions In NIH Research Funds

 

UC San Francisco ranked second among all institutions last year in biomedical research grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and was the top public recipient, while its School of Medicine led all schools in NIH grants nationwide, according to annual figures posted by the NIH.
 
These funds – nearly $521.3 million in total through contracts and grants – enable UCSF scientists to continue their pioneering efforts to understand the underlying causes of such diseases as cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, HIV, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease, and to work to develop improved therapies for patients.
 
The NIH is the largest source of funding for medical research in the world granting more than 80 percent of its budget to researchers in more than 2,500 universities and research institutions in every state across America and around the world.
 
The funding, considered a strong indicator of an institution’s strength in biomedical research, enables UCSF to deliver on its public mission of advancing health worldwide.
 
All four of UCSF’s professional schools were among the leading schools in their fields in receiving these highly competitive grants, with the School of Medicine receiving the most funding in medicine for the first time, at $448.7.2 million for fiscal year 2012, to support research, training and fellowships. In 2011, the medical school ranked second.
 
The UCSF schools of pharmacy and of dentistry also ranked first in their fields in NIH grants for 2012: pharmacy for the 33rd consecutive year, with $31.6 million; and dentistry for the 21st year, with $13.7 million. The UCSF School of Nursing ranked second, with $8.1 million in grants. All told, UCSF received $500.4 million total in grants, with an additional $20.8 million in NIH contracts, for which UCSF scientists compete to perform specific research projects for the national institutes.
 
"This funding is the lifeblood of biomedical research nationwide and is critical for advancing knowledge in human health,” said UCSF Chancellor Susan Desmond-Hellmann, MD, MPH. “At UCSF, these grants are supporting the work of our scientists as they address the most pressing questions across the health sciences and work to translate those into more precise care for people around the world."
 
The rankings reflect the breadth and scale of UCSF’s excellence across education and research in multiple health-science arenas, as well as the scale of the University’s $1 billion research enterprise.
 

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