News

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New Cancer Fighting Strategy Emerges from Antibody Signaling Discovery

February 25, 2010

A new discovery about cancer and the immune system points to previously unrecognized targets for drug development to battle solid tumors. The research also suggests that a drug already in use for more than a decade to treat non-Hodgkin's lymphoma might also be useful in ...
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UCSF Chancellor Cites Need for Faster Pipeline of Better, Cheaper Drugs for Cancer Patients

February 3, 2010

Before coming to UCSF, Chancellor Susan Desmond-Hellmann, MD, MPH, was a practicing oncologist, and later she was president of product development at Genentech, where she took the lead in developing some of the most successful cancer-fighting drugs in history. Among these drugs are Avastin, Rituxan, ...
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Cognitively Impaired Elderly Women Get Unneeded Screening Mammography, Study Finds

January 14, 2010

A significant percentage of U.S. women 70 years or older who were severely cognitively impaired received screening mammography that was unlikely to benefit them, according to a study of 2,131 elderly women conducted by researchers from the University of California, San Francisco. Overall, 18 percent ...
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Expert to Talk about Body's Natural Defenses in Preventing, Treating Cancer

January 14, 2010

David Servan-Schreiber, MD, PhD, a physician, neuroscientist, science writer, founding member of Doctors Without Borders and clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, will speak at UCSF on preventing and treating cancer. Members of the UCSF community are invited to ...
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St. Helena Hospital Cancer Center Affiliates with the UCSF Medical Center to Enhance Local Cancer Ca

January 13, 2010

Released jointly by St. Helena Hospital and UCSF Medical Center The Martin-O'Neil Cancer Center at St. Helena Hospital and the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCSF Medical Center have begun an affiliation that will provide North Bay patients with access to clinical ...
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UCSF Study Finds African-Americans Bear Disproportionate Burden of Smoking Costs in California

January 13, 2010

African Americans comprise six percent of the California adult population, yet they account for over eight percent of the state's smoking-attributable health care expenditures and 13 percent of smoking-attributable mortality costs, according to a new analysis by UCSF researchers. In order to provide an objective ...
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UCSF Researchers Are Mapping DNA from 100,000 People for Unique Kaiser Database

January 13, 2010

Mother Nature's tightly held secrets to healthy aging are in danger of being wrested away. The genes we inherit, the lives we lead and the places we live all affect our chances to evade major diseases and to maintain health as we grow older. To ...
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New Research on CT Radiation Exposures, Risks, Fuels Growing Concern

December 18, 2009

The use of computed tomography (CT) scans in medicine to diagnose disease, and in many cases save lives, has exploded in recent decades. The down side, a new study concludes, is that the radiation US patients receive from these medical exams will eventually result in ...
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Variable Doses of Radiation Raise Safety Concerns for CT Procedures

December 14, 2009

Radiation doses from common CT procedures vary widely and are higher than generally thought, raising concerns about increased risk for cancer, according to a new study led by UCSF imaging specialists. "In day-to-day clinical practice, we found significant variation in the radiation doses for the ...
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UCSF's Elizabeth Blackburn Delivers Nobel Lecture

December 9, 2009

What does TTAGGG spell? If you're human, it might spell long life. That's the sequence of DNA building blocks that keeps our cells ticking. The sequence bears repeating, and the more it repeats, the healthier we may be. In some populations loss of this DNA from key cells is associated with poor health and earlier death. In Stockholm, Sweden on Monday, UCSF's Elizabeth Blackburn, PhD, along with two fellow scientists with whom she will share the 2009 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, described discoveries leading to October's award announcement, including the first-ever identification of one of these key DNA sequences. The Nobel laureates also discussed what their discoveries and ongoing research tells us about health, cancer and aging. The lectures are part of a weeklong series of events that will culminate with Thursday's award ceremony. Blackburn, along with Carol Greider, PhD, of Johns Hopkins University, and Jack Szostak, PhD, from Harvard Medical School, will be awarded the prize on Thursday for discoveries that have led to an understanding of how the cells of organisms ranging from protozoans to people are equipped to defend the integrity of their genetic blueprints through many generations of cell divisions.