News

Around The World, Those Treated for Addiction Far More Likely to Smoke

Around The World, Those Treated for Addiction Far More Likely to Smoke

September 22, 2015

People in addiction treatment programs around the world use tobacco at two to three times the rate of people who are not being treated for addiction, according to a review of research studies from 20 countries other than the United States. The review, led by Joseph R. Guydish, PhD, a UC San Francisco professor of medicine and health policy, was published on Tuesday, Sept. 22 in the journal Addiction.

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Antibody Network Partners With Celgene for Cancer Therapies

September 15, 2015

A new collaboration between Celgene Corp. and the Recombinant Antibody Network (RAN), a consortium comprising research groups from UC San Francisco (UCSF), the University of Chicago and the University of Toronto, will support the development of next-generation, antibody-based cancer therapies.

Crunching Numbers to Combat Cancer

Crunching Numbers to Combat Cancer

September 14, 2015

UC San Francisco has received a National Cancer Institute grant of $5 million over the next five years to lead a massive effort to integrate the data from all experimental models across all types of cancer. The web-based repository is an important step in moving the fight against cancer toward precision medicine.

Smoke-Free Zones, Higher Taxes Deter Youth Smoking, Study Shows

Smoke-Free Zones, Higher Taxes Deter Youth Smoking, Study Shows

September 8, 2015

Banning smoking in the workplace and increasing taxes on cigarettes have discouraged teens and young adults from taking up smoking, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco and UC Merced.

Childhood Cancer Research at UCSF to Transcend Tissue Types With Innovative Grant

Childhood Cancer Research at UCSF to Transcend Tissue Types With Innovative Grant

September 8, 2015

Researchers at UC San Francisco are leading a five-year, $10 million research project dedicated to pediatric cancer, funded by the first grant of its kind to focus on a molecular pathway that underlies many cancers rather than on a cancer in a particular organ or tissue in the body.

Rare Melanoma Carries Unprecedented Burden of Mutations

Rare Melanoma Carries Unprecedented Burden of Mutations

September 7, 2015

A rare, deadly form of skin cancer known as desmoplasmic melanoma (DM) may possess the highest burden of gene mutations of any cancer, suggesting that immunotherapy may be a promising approach for treatment, according to an international team led by UC San Francisco scientists.

Genetic Makeup May Make Radiation Riskier for Pediatric Cancer Patients

Genetic Makeup May Make Radiation Riskier for Pediatric Cancer Patients

September 3, 2015

Genetic vulnerabilities associated with childhood cancers may make children undergoing radiation therapy more susceptible than adults to secondary cancers, according to novel insights from researchers at UC San Francisco.

Drug for Fungal Infections in Lung Transplant Recipients Increases Risk for Skin Cancer, Even Death

Drug for Fungal Infections in Lung Transplant Recipients Increases Risk for Skin Cancer, Even Death

September 3, 2015

Voriconazole, a prescription drug commonly used to treat fungal infections in lung transplant recipients, significantly increases the risk for skin cancer and even death, according to a new study by UC San Francisco researchers. The team recommends physicians consider patient-specific factors that could modify the drug’s risks and benefits, when providing care.

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DNA-Guided 3-D Printing of Human Tissue is Unveiled

September 1, 2015

A UCSF-led team has developed a technique to build tiny models of human tissues, called organoids, more precisely than ever before using a process that turns human cells into a biological equivalent of LEGO bricks.

Mammary Gland Is Shaped by Adaptive Immune System During Development

Mammary Gland Is Shaped by Adaptive Immune System During Development

August 27, 2015

In experiments with mouse tissue, UC San Francisco researchers have discovered that the adaptive immune system, generally associated with fighting infections, plays an active role in guiding the normal development of mammary glands, the only organs--in female humans as well as mice--that develop predominately after ...