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UCSF Scientists Discover Link Between Inflammation and Pancreatic Cancer

April 11, 2011

Solving part of a medical mystery, researchers at the University of California, San Francisco have established a link between molecules found in an inflamed pancreas and the early formation of pancreatic cancer - a discovery that may help scientists identify new ways to detect, ...
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Exercise May Prevent Impact of Stress on Telomeres, A Measure of Cell Health

April 4, 2011

UCSF scientists are reporting several studies showing that psychological stress leads to shorter telomeres - the protective caps on the ends of chromosomes that are a measure of cell age and, thus, health. The findings also suggest that exercise may prevent this damage. The team ...
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UCSF Team Discovers New Way to Predict Breast Cancer Survival and Enhance Effectiveness of Treatment

April 4, 2011

A team of researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) has discovered a new way to predict breast cancer survival based on an "immune profile" -- the relative levels of three types of immune cells within a tumor. Knowing a patient's profile may ...
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UCSF Researchers Identify Promising New Treatment for Childhood Leukemia

March 31, 2011

An experimental drug lessens symptoms of a rare form of childhood leukemia and offers significant insight into the cellular development of the disease, according to findings from a new UCSF study. The mouse model research could spearhead the development of new leukemia therapies and paves the way for future clinical trials in humans. "Although this drug did not produce a cure, it alleviated the symptoms of leukemia as long as the treatment was continued and delayed the development of a more aggressive disease," said senior author Benjamin Braun, MD, PhD, a pediatric cancer specialist at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital. "Maintaining a clinical remission for as long as we can may help patients who don't have other options, and perhaps will allow us to approach this disease as a chronic, but manageable, condition." Study results are published in the March 30, 2011, online edition of the journal Science Translational Medicine. The study focused on a type of leukemia called juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, or JMML. An aggressive blood cancer usually diagnosed in patients younger than 5, JMML accounts for 1 to 2 percent of all childhood leukemia cases. The disease develops in the bone marrow and leads to an elevated white blood cell count that interferes with bone marrow's ability to produce healthy red blood cells. The abnormal increase in white blood cells occurs when genetic changes, or mutations, arise in the genes that encode proteins in a cellular signaling network called the Ras pathway. This network, controlled by the Ras protein, is a critical regulator of cell growth and a frequent target of cancerous mutations. Currently, JMML is curable only through bone marrow transplantation, in which healthy blood stem cells are extracted from a matched donor and intravenously transplanted into the patient. Still, nearly half of patients relapse after undergoing a transplant, and others are not candidates for transplantation because of advanced illness or the lack of a suitable donor, Braun said.
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Analysis Suggests Cancer Risk of Backscatter Airport Scanners is Low

March 28, 2011

Calculations by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and the University of California, Berkeley estimate that the cancer risk associated with one type of airport security scanners is low based on the amount of radiation these devices emit, as long as they ...
AACR Names Frank McCormick New President-Elect

AACR Names Frank McCormick New President-Elect

March 23, 2011

Cancer research pioneer Frank McCormick, PhD, FRS, is the new president-elect of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), the world's oldest and largest scientific organization focused on preventing and curing cancer.