University of California San Francisco
Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

For Breast Cancer Patients, Never Too Late To Quit Smoking

For Breast Cancer Patients, Never Too Late To Quit Smoking

January 27, 2016

Documenting that it’s never too late to quit smoking, a large study of breast cancer survivors has found that those who quit smoking after their diagnosis had a 33 percent lower risk of death as a result of breast cancer than those who continued to smoke.

'Give Breast Cancer the Boot' Funds New Projects to Benefit Breast Cancer Patients

'Give Breast Cancer the Boot' Funds New Projects to Benefit Breast Cancer Patients

November 12, 2015

Projects focus on quality of life, new treatment options, patient navigation and decision support, survivorship, among others.

UCSF at Dreamforce 2015: Watch the Highlights

UCSF at Dreamforce 2015: Watch the Highlights

October 12, 2015

Each year, UCSF participates in the massive technology gathering by Salesforce, highlighting the latest innovations in health care and research.

Five Things Women Should Know About Breast Cancer

Five Things Women Should Know About Breast Cancer

October 1, 2015

Breast cancer is the most common kind of cancer among American women, except for skin cancer, and the second leading cause of cancer death in women, exceeded only by lung cancer. But emerging knowledge offers reason for optimism. Here are five things women should know about breast cancer, according to Dr. Laura Esserman.

UCSF Researchers Awarded Breast Cancer Research Funding from Susan G. Komen

UCSF Researchers Awarded Breast Cancer Research Funding from Susan G. Komen

September 28, 2015

Three UCSF researchers were awarded a total of $560,000 to support projects in breast cancer research. These grants are among those made to 124 researchers in 25 states and 15 countries, with about half of the grants targeted to early-career investigators.

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Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells Turn On Stem Cell Genes

September 23, 2015

Metastases cause the vast majority of cancer deaths, but their tiny seeds are so difficult to track that few researchers have managed to study them. Now, scientists from UC San Francisco describe capturing and studying individual metastatic cells from human breast cancer tumors implanted into mice as the cells escaped into the blood stream and began to form tumors elsewhere in the body.