University of California San Francisco
Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center
Adolescent Perceptions about Smoking Have Changed Over Decade

Adolescent Perceptions about Smoking Have Changed Over Decade

December 5, 2016

California adolescents perceive smoking cigarettes to be riskier – and less socially acceptable – than they did a dozen years ago, according to a new study that comes amid a changing tobacco product landscape.

Mutant Protein Linked to Spread of Lung Cancer within the Body

Mutant Protein Linked to Spread of Lung Cancer within the Body

November 21, 2016

The ability of lung tumor cells to spread rapidly within the body makes lung cancer difficult to eradicate and contributes to its status as the leading cause of U.S. cancer deaths in both men and women.

Broad New Partnership Launches Plan to Reduce Cancer in San Francisco

Broad New Partnership Launches Plan to Reduce Cancer in San Francisco

November 16, 2016

Cancer kills more San Francisco residents than any other cause besides heart disease, and costs patients, families and taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars each year. 

For Children With Brain Tumors, Next-Generation Sequencing May Lead to Different Diagnoses

For Children With Brain Tumors, Next-Generation Sequencing May Lead to Different Diagnoses

November 15, 2016

Next-generation sequencing for patients at UCSF Medical Center is prompting changes in brain tumor diagnoses for some children and a retooling of treatment plans in many cases.

UCSF Health and John Muir Health to Expand Cancer Care Collaboration

UCSF Health and John Muir Health to Expand Cancer Care Collaboration

October 25, 2016

UCSF Health and John Muir Health are augmenting their growing collaboration through a plan to expand world-class, compassionate cancer care.
 
Drug Target for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Found in New Study

Drug Target for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Found in New Study

October 24, 2016

A team of researchers led by UC San Francisco scientists has identified a new drug target for triple-negative breast cancer, an aggressive disease subtype that has the poorest outcomes and accounts for as many as one in five cases.