University of California San Francisco
Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center
How Scientists Might Tame Cancer

How Scientists Might Tame Cancer

January 4, 2020

from UCSF Magazine Winter 2020 The Future // Visions for 2050 New treatments like immunotherapy are producing astonishing outcomes for some cancer patients. Five-year survival rates have increased dramatically since the early 1960s. And novel therapies that target specific genetic mutations are prolonging and saving ...
Brain Organoids Reveal Glioblastoma Origins

Brain Organoids Reveal Glioblastoma Origins

January 3, 2020

Glioblastomas are the most aggressive form of brain cancer — they grow and spread rapidly through the brain and are virtually impossible to eradicate, typically leading to death within one or two years of diagnosis. Scientists are constantly seeking more powerful targeted therapies, but so far ...
Should You Take a Direct-to-Consumer DNA Test?

Should You Take a Direct-to-Consumer DNA Test?

December 18, 2019

Since the human genome was completely sequenced in 2003, genetic testing has exploded into a multibillion-dollar industry. And with the rise of so-called “direct-to-consumer” tests such as those sold by 23andMe, which don’t require a physician’s sign-off, investigating your genes is easier than ever. But ...
Year in Review: 2019

Year in Review: 2019

December 17, 2019

The opening of the PCMB led the news at the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center in 2019.  Whether through expediting drug discovery, tailoring genomic sequencing, or expanding palliative care, our UCSF cancer community remained committed to improving outcomes for every cancer patient. As ...
Art for Recovery Champion Paints Her Past, Present, and Future

Art for Recovery Champion Paints Her Past, Present, and Future

December 16, 2019

Cynthia Perlis, director of the UCSF Art for Recovery program, will retire this year after over 30 years at UCSF. Cindy looks back at a lifetime of service to patients and caregivers as exemplified with some of her favorite pieces of art. Click on the ...
In Childhood Cancer, Private Insurance Means Better Survival

In Childhood Cancer, Private Insurance Means Better Survival

December 16, 2019

Children and young adults with pediatric cancer are less likely to be alive five and 10 years following diagnosis if their health insurance is covered by Medicaid or other government agencies, compared to those with private insurance, according to researchers at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospitals.