Jeffrey A. Bluestone, PhD

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Jeffrey A. Bluestone, PhD

Director of the UCSF Hormone Research Institute, UCSF
A.W. and Mary Margaret Clausen Distinguished Professorship in Metabolism and Endocrinology, UCSF

jbluestone@immunetolerance.org

Box 0540, UCSF
San Francisco, CA 94143-0542

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Cancer Center Membership

Associate Member » Cancer, Immunity, and Microenvironment

Research Summary

Jeffrey Bluestone, PhD, was appointed executive vice chancellor and provost at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), March 2010, having served in a number of posts including Director, UCSF Diabetes Center and the Immune Tolerance Network and as interim vice chancellor—research.

As emeritus executive vice chancellor and provost, he served as chief academic officer, guided the research and academic enterprise at UCSF, advancing the campus priorities in close collaboration with the chancellor and the campus leadership team, and oversaw the campus ethics and compliance enterprise.

As interim vice chancellor—research, Dr. Bluestone directed the advancement of cross-campus research initiatives, such as enhancing core research facilities. In this capacity, he played a leading role in coordinating and integrating current research cores. He also worked to strengthen external research partnerships, particularly with industry, and focused on facilitating the translation of UCSF discoveries into public benefit.

In 2009, Dr. Bluestone led the UCSF committee to strategize and secure funds available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, making the campus one of the top institutional recipients in the nation of science-based stimulus funds.

Dr. Bluestone, who holds the A.W. and Mary Margaret Clausen Distinguished Professorship in Metabolism and Endocrinology and is current director of the Hormone Research Institute, joined the UCSF faculty in 2000. He is an international leader in the field of immunotherapy, with a stellar record of scholarly achievement and a decade of significant contributions to the research enterprise at UCSF, including the creation and directorship of an integrated UCSF Diabetes Center to focus on translating basic research in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes into improved therapies for patients. He also founded and directed the Immune Tolerance Network, a consortium of more than 1,000 of the world’s leading scientific researchers and clinical specialists from nearly 50 institutions, with the mission of testing new therapies to promote immune tolerance in transplantation, autoimmune diseases, asthma and allergic diseases.

As a scientist, Dr. Bluestone’s research has helped clarify the body’s immune response on a molecular level. His research has catalyzed recent progress in stem cell research, islet cell transplantation and immune tolerance therapies – research that has formidably translated into drugs to treat human disease.

Through his 30-year scientific career, he has authored more than 300 peer-reviewed publications that include prominent papers in Nature, Nature Immunology, and the Journal of Immunology and Diabetes. He has received numerous accolades for his work, including his 2006 election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Mary Tyler Moore & Robert Levine Excellence in Clinical Research Award from the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, and the distinguished alumni award from the Cornell Graduate School of Medical Science.

Prior to joining UCSF, Bluestone was at the University of Chicago, where he was a member of the Ben May Institute for Cancer Research, rising over 13 years from an associate professor to the director of the institute. He had previously worked for seven years in various roles at the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health, ultimately becoming a senior investigator in the Immunology Branch of the National Cancer Institute.

Bluestone earned both his BS in biology and his MS in microbiology from Rutgers State University, and his PhD in immunology from the Cornell Graduate School of Medical Science (Sloan-Kettering Division).

Education

Cook College, Rutgers University, B.S., 1974, Biology
Rutgers - State University, NJ, M.S., 1977, Microbiology
Cornell Graduate School of Medical Science (Sloan-Kettering Division), Ph.D., 1980, Immunology


Professional Experience

  • 1980-1982
    Anna Fuller Fund Postdoctoral Fellow, Immunology Branch, National Cancer Institute, NIH
  • 1982-1982
    Laboratory Leader, Senior Staff Fellow, Transplantation Biology Section, Immunology Branch, NCI, NIH
  • 1986-1982
    Senior Investigator, Transplantation Biology Section, Immunology Branch, NCI, NIH
  • 1987-1992
    Associate Professor, Ben May Institute, Dept. of Pathology and the Committee on Immunology, University of Chicago
  • 1991-2002
    Professor, Ben May Institute, Department of Pathology and the Committee on Immunology, University of Chicago and Chairman, Committee on Immunology
  • 1995-2002
    Director, Ben May Institute for Cancer Research
  • 1999-present
    Director, Juvenile Diabetes Center, University of Chicago and University of Minnesota
  • 1999-present
    Director, Immune Tolerance Network
  • 2000-present
    A.W. and Mary Margaret Clausen Distinguished Professor of Metabolism and Endocrinology; and Director, UCSF Diabetes Center, the Metabolic Research Unit and the Hormone Research Institute, UCSF

Honors & Awards

  • 1987-1982
    Gould Foundation Faculty Scholar
  • 1982
    American Cancer Society Faculty Scholar
  • 1992
    Guggenheim Senior Fellowship
  • 1992
    Fogarty Senior Research Fellowship
  • 1992
    Cornell Medical School - Distinguished Alumni Award
  • 2002
    Priscilla White Lecturer, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Joslin Diabetes Center
  • 2002
    Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Gerold & Kayla Grodsky Basic Science Award
  • 2002
    American Society for Transplantation Roche Distinguished Research Award
  • 2002
    Mary Tyler Moore & Robert Levine Excellence in Clinical Research Award, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation
  • 2002
    Elected, American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Selected Publications

  1. Type 1 diabetes immunotherapy using polyclonal regulatory T cells. Sci Transl Med. 2015 Nov 25; 7(315):315ra189.
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  2. Shifting the Evolving CAR T Cell Platform into Higher Gear. Cancer Cell. 2015 Oct 12; 28(4):401-2.
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  3. Targeting Treg signaling for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Curr Opin Immunol. 2015 Dec; 37:11-20.
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  4. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Aug 18; 112(33):10437-42.
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  5. Interleukin-33 and Interferon-? Counter-Regulate Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cell Activation during Immune Perturbation. Immunity. 2015 Jul 21; 43(1):161-74.
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  6. Divergent Phenotypes of Human Regulatory T Cells Expressing the Receptors TIGIT and CD226. J Immunol. 2015 Jul 1; 195(1):145-55.
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  7. IL-2: Change Structure … Change Function. Immunity. 2015 May 19; 42(5):779-81.
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  8. T cells in the control of organ-specific autoimmunity. J Clin Invest. 2015 Jun 1; 125(6):2250-60.
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  9. The therapeutic potential of regulatory T cells for the treatment of autoimmune disease. Expert Opin Ther Targets. 2015 Aug; 19(8):1091-103.
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  10. Immunotherapy: Making the case for precision medicine. Sci Transl Med. 2015 Mar 25; 7(280):280ed3.
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  11. The immune system in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: Friend or foe. Rare Dis. 2015; 3(1):e1010966.
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  12. The chromatin-modifying enzyme ezh2 is critical for the maintenance of regulatory T cell identity after activation. Immunity. 2015 Feb 17; 42(2):227-38.
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  13. Control of PI(3) kinase in Treg cells maintains homeostasis and lineage stability. Nat Immunol. 2015 Feb; 16(2):188-96.
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  14. Innate Antiviral Host Defense Attenuates TGF-ß Function through IRF3-Mediated Suppression of Smad Signaling. Mol Cell. 2014 Dec 18; 56(6):723-37.
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  15. Tolerance induction and reversal of diabetes in mice transplanted with human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm. Cell Stem Cell. 2015 Feb 5; 16(2):148-57.
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  16. Interleukin-5-producing group 2 innate lymphoid cells control eosinophilia induced by interleukin-2 therapy. Blood. 2014 Dec 4; 124(24):3572-6.
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  17. Regulatory T cells suppress muscle inflammation and injury in muscular dystrophy. Sci Transl Med. 2014 Oct 15; 6(258):258ra142.
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  18. Aberrant innate immune activation following tissue injury impairs pancreatic regeneration. PLoS One. 2014; 9(7):e102125.
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  19. Tyrosine 201 of the cytoplasmic tail of CTLA-4 critically affects T regulatory cell suppressive function. Eur J Immunol. 2014 Jun; 44(6):1737-46.
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  20. Pathogenic conversion of Foxp3+ T cells into TH17 cells in autoimmune arthritis. Nat Med. 2014 Jan; 20(1):62-8.
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