Nancy J. Boudreau, PhD

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Nancy J. Boudreau, PhD

Professor, Department of Surgery, UCSF

nancyjb@itsa.ucsf.edu

Phone: (415) 206-6951 (voice)
Box 1302, UCSF
San Francisco, CA 94143-1302

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Cancer Center Membership

Associate Member » Breast Oncology» Cancer, Immunity, and Microenvironment

Education

Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, B.Sc. (Hon), 1981, Biology
Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, M.Sc., 1984, Pharmacology
University of Toronto, Ph.D., 1991, Pathology


Professional Experience

  • 1985-1987
    Research Assistant, Division of Cardiovascular Research, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Maintenance of vascular cell differentiated phenotype in culture
  • 1987-1991
    Graduate Student, Department of Pathology, University of Toronto; Extracellular matrix and vascular cell behavior. Ontario Graduate Scholarship-1989; University of Toronto Open Graduate Fellowship-1989; Emmanuel Farber Award in Pathology-1989; Canadian Society of Clinical Investigation Trainee Award-1990; Medical Research Council of Canada Studentship-1990
  • 1991-1995
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology, LBL, University of California, Berkeley; Susceptibility of endothelium to transformation in the chick embryo: Apoptosis and the regulation of gene expression by the extracellular matrix. Medical Research Council of Canada Fellowship-1992-1995.
  • 1995-1996
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Vascular Biology and Immunology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA; Extracellular matrix regulation of endothelial homeobox expression and regulation of endothelial integrin expression in angiogenesis. Joseph Drown Foundation Fellowship–1995-1996.
  • 1996-1998
    Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy, Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA; Homeobox genes and angiogenesis and regulation of endothelial gene expression by the extracellular matrix
  • 1998-2003
    Assistant Professor, Department of Surgery, University of California, San Francisco
  • 2003-present
    Director, Surgical Research Lab, San Francisco General Hospital
  • 3003-present
    Associate Professor, Department of Surgery, University of California, San Francisco
  • 2009-present
    Professor, Department of Surgery, University of California San Francisco

Honors & Awards

  • 1989
    Ontario Graduate Scholarship
  • 1989
    University of Toronto Open Graduate Fellowship
  • 1989
    Emmanuel Farber Award in Pathology
  • 1990
    Canadian Society of Clinical Investigation Trainee Award
  • 1990
    Medical Research Council of Canada Studentship
  • 1992-1995
    Medical Research Council of Canada Fellowship
  • 1995-1996
    Joseph Drown Foundation Fellowship

Selected Publications

  1. Multivalent Conjugates of Sonic Hedgehog Accelerate Diabetic Wound Healing. Tissue Eng Part A. 2015 Sep; 21(17-18):2366-78.
    View on PubMed
  2. Sustained Endothelial Expression of HoxA5 In Vivo Impairs Pathological Angiogenesis And Tumor Progression. PLoS One. 2015; 10(3):e0121720.
    View on PubMed
  3. The dual roles of homeobox genes in vascularization and wound healing. Cell Adh Migr. 2012 Nov-Dec; 6(6):457-70.
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  4. Isolation and expansion of endothelial progenitor cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells. Methods Mol Biol. 2012; 916:81-96.
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  5. Temporal changes in Hox gene expression accompany endothelial cell differentiation of embryonic stem cells. Cell Adh Migr. 2011 Mar-Apr; 5(2):133-41.
    View on PubMed
  6. HOXA9 regulates BRCA1 expression to modulate human breast tumor phenotype. J Clin Invest. 2010 May; 120(5):1535-50.
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  7. Stromal regulation of vessel stability by MMP14 and TGFbeta. Dis Model Mech. 2010 May-Jun; 3(5-6):317-32.
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  8. Endothelial cell migration and vascular endothelial growth factor expression are the result of loss of breast tissue polarity. Cancer Res. 2009 Aug 15; 69(16):6721-9.
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  9. HOXA3 modulates injury-induced mobilization and recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells. Stem Cells. 2009 Jul; 27(7):1654-65.
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  10. Restoring transcription factor HoxA5 expression inhibits the growth of experimental hemangiomas in the brain. J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 2009 Jun; 68(6):626-32.
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  11. Managing tumor angiogenesis: lessons from VEGF-resistant tumors and wounds. Adv Cancer Res. 2009; 103:25-42.
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  12. HoxA5 stabilizes adherens junctions via increased Akt1. Cell Adh Migr. 2007 Oct-Dec; 1(4):185-95.
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  13. Effects of decreased insulin-like growth factor-1 stimulation on hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha protein synthesis and function during cutaneous repair in diabetic mice. Wound Repair Regen. 2007 Sep-Oct; 15(5):628-35.
    View on PubMed
  14. Sustained expression of Hif-1alpha in the diabetic environment promotes angiogenesis and cutaneous wound repair. Wound Repair Regen. 2007 Sep-Oct; 15(5):636-45.
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  15. Integrin alpha9beta1 directly binds to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A and contributes to VEGF-A-induced angiogenesis. J Biol Chem. 2007 May 18; 282(20):15187-96.
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  16. Hemangiomas and homeobox gene expression. J Craniofac Surg. 2006 Jul; 17(4):767-71.
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  17. Forcing the third dimension. Cell. 2006 May 5; 125(3):429-31.
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  18. Pbx1 is required for Hox D3-mediated angiogenesis. Angiogenesis. 2005; 8(4):289-96.
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  19. Sulf-2, a proangiogenic heparan sulfate endosulfatase, is upregulated in breast cancer. Neoplasia. 2005 Nov; 7(11):1001-10.
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  20. Homeobox D10 induces phenotypic reversion of breast tumor cells in a three-dimensional culture model. Cancer Res. 2005 Aug 15; 65(16):7177-85.
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