Sophie Dumont, PhD

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Sophie Dumont, PhD

Assistant Professor, Dept of Cell & Tissue Biology, Dept of Cellular & Molecular Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco

Education

Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA, B.A., 08/95-06/99, Physics
University of Oxford, UK, D.Phil. candidate, 09/99-08/00, Theoretical Physics
University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA, Ph.D., 08/00-12/05, Molecular Biophysics
University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA, Postdoc, 01/06-03/06, Molecular Biophysics
Harvard Society of Fellows, Junior Fellow, 07/06-06/09, Cellular Biophysics
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA, Postdoc, 07/06-05/12, Cellular Biophysics
 


Professional Experience

  • 1997-1999
    Undergraduate Student Researcher, Princeton University, Advisor: Prof. Stanislas Leibler (Physics), Thesis: Thermal sensing network of E. coli
  • 1999-2000
    Graduate Student Researcher, University of Oxford, Advisor: Prof. Douglas Abraham (Theoretical Physics), Topic: Statistical mechanics of neural networks
  • 2000-2005
    Graduate Student Researcher, University of California, Berkeley, Advisor: Prof. Carlos Bustamante (Physics), Thesis: Force and helicase-catalyzed mechanical unfolding of single RNA molecules
  • 2006
    Postdoctoral fellow, University of California, Berkeley, Advisors: Prof. Carlos Bustamante (Physics), Prof. Ignacio Tinoco Jr. (Chemistry), Topic: Helicase mechanochemistry
  • 2006-2009
    Junior Fellow, Harvard Society of Fellows, Mentor: Prof. Timothy J. Mitchison (Systems Biology), Topic: Mechanical forces in cell division
  • 2006-2012
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard Medical School, Mentor: Prof. Timothy J. Mitchison (Systems Biology), Topic: Mechanical forces in cell division
  • 2012-
    Assistant Professor, University of California, San Francisco, Dept of Cell & Tissue Biology, Dept of Cellular & Molecular Pharmacology

Honors & Awards

  • 1999
    Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma Xi
  • 1999
    Allen G. Shenstone Prize in Physics, Princeton University
  • 1999-2000
    Rhodes Scholarship
  • 1999-2001
    Québec Fund for Nature and Technology Research Fellowship (masters)
  • 2001-2003
    Natural Sciences and Engineering Council of Canada Fellowship (doctoral)
  • 2001-2004
    Québec Fund for Nature and Technology Research Fellowship (doctoral)
  • 2004
    Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor Award, UC Berkeley
  • 2004
    Teaching Effectiveness Graduate Student Instructor Award, UC Berkeley
  • 2004-2005
    Canadian Institutes of Health Research Fellowship (doctoral)
  • 2006
    Alan Bearden Outstanding Graduate Research Award, UC Berkeley
  • 2006
    Weintraub Graduate Student Award
  • 2006-2009
    Junior Fellow, Harvard Society of Fellows
  • 2007-2009
    Harvard University William F. Milton Fund Award
  • 2009-2011
    Charles A. King Trust Postdoctoral Fellowship
  • 2010-2015
    NIH K99/R00 Pathway to Independence Award
  • 2013-2015
    Sloan Research Fellow
  • 2013-2015
    Kimmel Cancer Foundation Scholar
  • 2013-2016
    Searle Scholar
  • 2013-2018
    Rita Allen Foundation and Milton E. Cassel Scholar
  • 2015-2020
    NIH New Innovator Award
  • 2016
    Margaret Oakley Dayhoff Award of the Biophysical Society

Selected Publications

  1. Kinesin-5: A Team Is Just the Sum of Its Parts. Dev Cell. 2015 Sep 28; 34(6):609-10.
    View on PubMed
  2. Draft De Novo Transcriptome of the Rat Kangaroo Potorous tridactylus as a Tool for Cell Biology. PLoS One. 2015; 10(8):e0134738.
    View on PubMed
  3. Emergent mechanics of biological structures. Mol Biol Cell. 2014 Nov 5; 25(22):3461-5.
    View on PubMed
  4. Force on spindle microtubule minus ends moves chromosomes. J Cell Biol. 2014 Jul 21; 206(2):245-56.
    View on PubMed
  5. Spindle size: small droplets and a big step forward. Curr Biol. 2014 Feb 3; 24(3):R116-8.
    View on PubMed
  6. Imaging and physically probing kinetochores in live dividing cells. Methods Cell Biol. 2014; 123:467-87.
    View on PubMed
  7. Deformations within moving kinetochores reveal different sites of active and passive force generation. Science. 2012 Jul 20; 337(6092):355-8.
    View on PubMed
  8. Comprehensive Biophysics. Mechanical Forces in Mitosis. 2012; 298-320.
    View on PubMed
  9. Chromosome segregation: spindle mechanics come to life. Curr Biol. 2011 Sep 27; 21(18):R688-90.
    View on PubMed
  10. Force and length in the mitotic spindle. Curr Biol. 2009 Sep 15; 19(17):R749-61.
    View on PubMed
  11. Compression regulates mitotic spindle length by a mechanochemical switch at the poles. Curr Biol. 2009 Jul 14; 19(13):1086-95.
    View on PubMed
  12. How does a millimeter-sized cell find its center? Cell Cycle. 2009 Apr 15; 8(8):1115-21.
    View on PubMed
  13. Evidence for an upper limit to mitotic spindle length. Curr Biol. 2008 Aug 26; 18(16):1256-61.
    View on PubMed
  14. NS3 helicase actively separates RNA strands and senses sequence barriers ahead of the opening fork. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Aug 28; 104(35):13954-9.
    View on PubMed
  15. RNA translocation and unwinding mechanism of HCV NS3 helicase and its coordination by ATP. Nature. 2006 Jan 5; 439(7072):105-8.
    View on PubMed
  16. Identifying kinetic barriers to mechanical unfolding of the T. thermophila ribozyme. Science. 2003 Mar 21; 299(5614):1892-5.
    View on PubMed
  17. Equilibrium information from nonequilibrium measurements in an experimental test of Jarzynski's equality. Science. 2002 Jun 7; 296(5574):1832-5.
    View on PubMed

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