Richard M. Locksley, MD

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Richard M. Locksley, MD

Professor, Department of Medicine (Infectious Diseases), UCSF
Marion and Herbert Sandler Distinguished Professorship in Asthma Research, UCSF

locksley@medicine.ucsf.edu

Phone: (415) 476-5859 (voice)
Box 0654, UCSF
San Francisco, CA 94143-0654

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Cancer Center Membership

Associate Member » Cancer, Immunity, and Microenvironment

Education

Harvard College, Cambridge, MA, B.A., 1970, Biochemistry
Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY, M.D., 1976, Medicine
Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA, 1976-80, Resident, Chief Resident
Univ. Wash. School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, 1980-83, Infectious Diseases


Professional Experience

  • 1986-2003
    Chief, Division of Infectious Diseases, UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco, CA
  • 1988-93
    Member and Chair (1991-93), Tropical Medicine and Parasitology Study Section, NIH
  • 1991-94
    Co-Director, Immunology Section, Biology of Parasitism Course, Woods Hole, MA
  • 1994-99
    Chair, Parasitology Pathogenesis Committee, WHO, Geneva
  • 1995-05
    Council, Chair (1998), Midwinter Conference of Immunologists, Asilomar
  • 1995-01
    Faculty, Assoc. of American Immunology Annual Course, Advanced Immunology
  • 1997-present
    Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, UCSF
  • 1998-01
    Member, Chair (2000-01), US-Japan Immunology Board, NIH
  • 2002-05
    Council, NIAID, National Institutes of Health
  • 2003-present
    Director, Strategic Asthma Basic Research Center, UCSF

Honors & Awards

  • American Society for Clinical Investigation, 1991
  • Burroughs Wellcome Fund Scholar in Molecular Parasitology, 1992-97
  • Fellow, Infectious Diseases Society of American, 1992
  • Association of American Physicians, 1994
  • Bailey K Ashford Medal, American Society Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 1994
  • Ellison Medical Foundation Senior Scholar in Global Infectious Diseases, 2001-05
  • Distinguished Service Award, American Association of Immunologists, 2003
  • Inspirational Teacher Award, UCSF class of 2006
  • Sandler Distinguished Professorship, 2003
  • American Academy of Arts & Sciences, 2005
  • R37 MERIT Award, NIAID/NIH, 2006

Selected Publications

  1. Tuft-cell-derived IL-25 regulates an intestinal ILC2-epithelial response circuit. Nature. 2016 Jan 14; 529(7585):221-5.
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  2. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells utilize the IRF4-IL-9 module to coordinate epithelial cell maintenance of lung homeostasis. Mucosal Immunol. 2015 Jul 1.
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  3. Interleukin-33 and Interferon-? Counter-Regulate Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cell Activation during Immune Perturbation. Immunity. 2015 Jul 21; 43(1):161-74.
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  4. Interleukin-33 in Tissue Homeostasis, Injury, and Inflammation. Immunity. 2015 Jun 16; 42(6):1005-19.
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  5. New blood: Creative funding of disease-specific research. Sci Transl Med. 2015 May 20; 7(288):288ed5.
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  6. Eosinophil-specific deletion of I?Ba in mice reveals a critical role of NF-?B-induced Bcl-xL for inhibition of apoptosis. Blood. 2015 Jun 18; 125(25):3896-904.
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  7. IgE-activated basophils regulate eosinophil tissue entry by modulating endothelial function. J Exp Med. 2015 Apr 6; 212(4):513-24.
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  8. A Novel Model for IFN-?-Mediated Autoinflammatory Syndromes. J Immunol. 2015 Mar 1; 194(5):2358-68.
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  9. Activated type 2 innate lymphoid cells regulate beige fat biogenesis. Cell. 2015 Jan 15; 160(1-2):74-87.
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  10. Identification and distribution of developing innate lymphoid cells in the fetal mouse intestine. Nat Immunol. 2015 Feb; 16(2):153-60.
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  11. Allergic inflammation--innately homeostatic. Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol. 2015 Mar; 7(3):a016352.
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  12. Interleukin-5-producing group 2 innate lymphoid cells control eosinophilia induced by interleukin-2 therapy. Blood. 2014 Dec 4; 124(24):3572-6.
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  13. I-L-C-2 it: type 2 immunity and group 2 innate lymphoid cells in homeostasis. Curr Opin Immunol. 2014 Dec; 31:58-65.
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  14. Eosinophils and type 2 cytokine signaling in macrophages orchestrate development of functional beige fat. Cell. 2014 Jun 5; 157(6):1292-308.
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  15. Leukotriene B4 amplifies eosinophil accumulation in response to nematodes. J Exp Med. 2014 Jun 30; 211(7):1281-8.
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  16. Eosinophils are recruited in response to chitin exposure and enhance Th2-mediated immune pathology in Aspergillus fumigatus infection. Infect Immun. 2014 Aug; 82(8):3199-205.
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  17. Asthma and the flu: a tricky two-step. Immunol Cell Biol. 2014 May-Jun; 92(5):389-91.
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  18. Chitin activates parallel immune modules that direct distinct inflammatory responses via innate lymphoid type 2 and ?d T cells. Immunity. 2014 Mar 20; 40(3):414-24.
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  19. Cutting edge: IL-25 elicits innate lymphoid type 2 and type II NKT cells that regulate obesity in mice. J Immunol. 2013 Dec 1; 191(11):5349-53.
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  20. Type 2 innate lymphoid cells control eosinophil homeostasis. Nature. 2013 Oct 10; 502(7470):245-8.
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